Walk With Everyday Steps

So you want to get active. You recognize the need to set personal health goals. But for many people, it can be challenging to get started with an exercise program and keep it going over the long term. That’s why the Everyday Steps Guide was designed to help those living with type 2 diabetes develop a walking routine—one step at a time.

Consult with your doctor before starting any walking or exercise program.

 
Farxiga® (dapagliflozin)

Brought to you by Farxiga® (dapagliflozin), and developed in partnership with the Diabetes Hands Foundation.

FARXIGA (far-SEE-guh) is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. FARXIGA should not be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine).

Diabetes Hands Foundation
 

Why should you walk every day?

Sure, it'll get you where you need to go. But it's also a great way to reach your health goals and stay fit.

Benefits of walking regularly may include:

  • Reducing blood sugar and improving the body’s ability to use insulin
  • Lowering the risk of health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, or stroke
  • Boosting good cholesterol levels and lowering bad cholesterol numbers
  • Helping burn more calories
  • Lowering stress levels
  • Strengthening muscles and bones

Walking is one of the easiest ways to start a fitness habit. You can walk whether you live in the city, suburbs, or country, on the East or West Coast, or in between. And if squeezing 30 minutes into your schedule is a challenge, you can spread your walks out throughout the day and get just as much benefit. All you need is a good pair of shoes and a strategy for staying on track. Need some motivation to get started? Check out our walking guide to take that first step—or leap—toward achieving a healthier lifestyle. Consult with your doctor before making any changes to your diabetes management plan and before starting any diet or exercise program.

 

This Everyday Steps Guide is here to help you turn walking into a healthy habit. Brought to you by FARXIGA—and developed in partnership with the Diabetes Hands Foundation, home of TuDiabetes—these 12 tips can help you start a walking routine and stick with it. Just remember to talk with your diabetes care team before you begin any exercise program.

Walking Routine Step 1—Set a GoalWalking Routine Step 1—Set a Goal

1

Set a goal

LEARN MORE

X

Set a goal for yourself and track your progress. You can use a pedometer or a smartphone app to keep track of your steps, time, distance, etc., in order to meet your walking goals. They even let you compare your progress to other people.

Walking Routine Step 2—Build Up GraduallyWalking Routine Step 2—Build Up Gradually

2

Build up gradually

LEARN MORE

X

Don’t be discouraged if you can’t walk for long at first. Remember that habits build. Each time you walk, you are growing a healthy habit. When you keep at it, eventually, it becomes easier.

Walking Routine Step 3—Invite a FriendWalking Routine Step 3—Invite a Friend

3

Invite a friend

LEARN MORE

X

Invite a friend to walk with you. Having a walking partner keeps it fun and can keep you accountable. If your companion has four legs, think about using a retractable leash so you can keep pumping your arms as you walk.

Walking Routine Step 4—Make It MusicalWalking Routine Step 4—Make It Musical

4

Make it musical

LEARN MORE

X

Make a song list on your smartphone or MP3 player. Faster songs can help you walk faster, so change the tempo from time to time. You can find specific playlists for walking at Spotify.com and Pandora.com, among other sites.

Walking Routine Step 5—Get Up to SpeedWalking Routine Step 5—Get Up to Speed

5

Get up to speed

LEARN MORE

X

The US Surgeon General advises that you walk fast enough to get your heart rate up. How do you know when you’re there? A good rule of thumb is if you can still talk but not sing while you’re walking, you’re probably at the right pace.

Walking Routine Step 6—Reward Your EffortWalking Routine Step 6—Reward Your Effort

6

Reward your effort

LEARN MORE

X

Give yourself a healthy reward after each day's walk. A favorite sugar-free beverage or healthy snack that you love are great options.

Walking Routine Step 7—Sign a ContractWalking Routine Step 7—Sign a Contract

7

Sign a contract

LEARN MORE

X

Sign a commitment contract. By putting it into writing, you’ll have more reason to stay on track with your walking routine. And your friends and family can help by holding you accountable.

Walking Routine Step 8—Change It UpWalking Routine Step 8—Change It Up

8

Change it up

LEARN MORE

X

Don’t get stuck in the same routine. You can find new routes through a local walking group on MeetUp.com. If you live somewhere without sidewalks or other safe routes, consider finding a local track, school gym, or indoor mall to walk.

Walking Routine Step 9—Add to the MixWalking Routine Step 9—Add to the Mix

9

Add to the mix

LEARN MORE

X

Explore different types of walking. Use AstraZeneca’s Fit2Me ™ diet and lifestyle support program and find the best fit for you. Power walking or the addition of strength exercises such as walking lunges can help keep your routine fresh.

Walking Routine Step 10—Socialize ItWalking Routine Step 10—Socialize It

10

Socialize it

LEARN MORE

X

Consider using social media platforms like Facebook or Twitter to share your daily distance and time. By going public with your goals, successes, and challenges, you can get words of encouragement from your friends.

Walking Routine Step 11—Up For the Test?Walking Routine Step 11—Up For the Test?

11

Are you up for the Test?

LEARN MORE

X

Each October, you can incorporate the Diabetes Hands Foundation’s Big Blue Test into your walking program. Every time you participate, the Diabetes Hands Foundation makes a donation on your behalf to nonprofit groups that are providing life-saving supplies, services, and education to people with diabetes in need. Plus, participants in the Test report an average blood sugar drop of 20% after just 14 to 20 minutes of exercise.

Walking Routine Step 12—Make It About OthersWalking Routine Step 12—Make It About Others

12

Make it about others

LEARN MORE

X

Use your walks to change the world. Sign up for a local charity walk of your choice to allow your footsteps to leave a charitable footprint in a cause of importance to you.

 
 

Important Safety Information for FARXIGA® (dapagliflozin)

Who should not take FARXIGA?

Do not take FARXIGA if you:

  • are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic... Read More

Who should not take FARXIGA?

Do not take FARXIGA if you:

  • are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash... Read More

Who should not take FARXIGA?

Do not take FARXIGA if you:

  • are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face... Read More

Who should not take FARXIGA?

Do not take FARXIGA if you:

  • are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that... Read More

Who should not take FARXIGA?

Do not take FARXIGA if you:

  • are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away
  • have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA

What are the possible side effects of FARXIGA?

FARXIGA may cause serious side effects including:

  • Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems
  • Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL
  • Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure
  • Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Tell your doctor if you have any signs or symptoms of UTI including a burning feeling when passing urine, a need to urinate often, the need to urinate right away, pain in the lower part of your stomach (pelvis), or blood in the urine with or without fever, back pain, nausea, or vomiting
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you take FARXIGA with another medicine that can cause low blood sugar, such as sulfonylureas or insulin. Symptoms of low blood sugar include shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, dizziness, hunger, headache, and irritability. Follow your healthcare provider's instructions for treating low blood sugar
  • Vaginal yeast infections in women who take FARXIGA. Talk to your healthcare provider if you experience vaginal odor, white or yellowish vaginal discharge (discharge may be lumpy or look like cottage cheese), or vaginal itching
  • Yeast infection of skin around the penis (balanitis) in men who take FARXIGA. Talk to your healthcare provider if you experience redness, itching, or swelling of the penis; rash of the penis; foul smelling discharge from the penis; or pain in the skin around penis. Certain uncircumcised men may have swelling of the penis that makes it difficult to pull back the skin around the tip of the penis
  • Increase in bad cholesterol (LDL-C). Your healthcare provider should check your LDL-C during treatment with FARXIGA
  • Bladder cancer. In studies of FARXIGA in people with diabetes, bladder cancer occurred in a few more people who were taking FARXIGA than in people who were taking other diabetes medications. There were too few cases of bladder cancer to know if bladder cancer was related to FARXIGA. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have blood or a red color in your urine or pain while you urinate

The most common side effects of FARXIGA include yeast infections of the vagina or penis, and changes in urination, including urgent need to urinate more often, in larger amounts, or at night.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking FARXIGA?

Before you take FARXIGA, tell your healthcare provider:

  • all of your medical conditions, including problems with your kidneys, liver, bladder, or pancreas
  • if you have had, or have risk factors for, ketoacidosis (including type 1 diabetes, are eating less due to illness, surgery, or a change in your diet, are going to have surgery, or binge drink)
  • if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. FARXIGA may harm your unborn baby
  • if you are breastfeeding, or plan to breastfeed. It is unknown if FARXIGA passes into your breast milk
  • about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements

What is FARXIGA?

FARXIGA is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes.

FARXIGA should not be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine).